Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image

admin, Author at Fair Debt Collection Help - Page 3 of 5

Check out the latest news.

28 Oct

By

No Comments

Protecting Your Privacy When in Debt

October 28, 2013 | By | No Comments

keep out

Ever have the tense, stressful feeling of concern that your personal financial information might be shared with others by debt collectors?

Fortunately for consumers, The Fair Debt Collection Practices Act protects private information from being shared. The FDCPA says “discussions” about the debt can only be held with:

  • The Individual
  • The Creditor
  • An Attorney representing one of the parties
  • A Credit Bureau

It is illegal for debt collectors to try to shame you into paying your debt by contacting any other third parties and sharing your private financial information.

  • Debt collectors cannot exchange (with other agencies) information about individuals who allegedly owe a debt.
  • Cannot distribute a list of alleged debtors to its creditor subscribers.
  • Cannot compile a list of debtors for sale to others.
  • Cannot leave messages with third parties, asking them to have the debtor call the collector.  An exception to this rule allows debt collectors to contact third parties to obtain contact information for a debtor whom the collector does not know how to reach, so long as they do not disclose the reason for the call (collection of a debt).

If you’ve been dealing with debt collectors because of your credit card, student loan, medical or other consumer debt, you are not alone. Call The Law Firm of Mitch Luxenburg’s experienced fair debt collection attorneys toll-free at (877) 846-1209 to find out how we can help you. You can also complete our online form for a free FDCPA case review. The debt collector has to pay your legal fees so you’ll be charged nothing for your case.

Photo by: Zach Klein

23 Oct

By

No Comments

Can Debt Collectors Call Your Employer?

October 23, 2013 | By | No Comments

Can a collection agency contact my boss? Can a collection agency send legal documents to my employer? Can a collection agency call me at work? These are all questions that may have crossed your mind when being contacted by debt collectors who try to intimidate and embarrass you into paying off your debt.
phones

A debt collector may contact anyone other than you, but only to find out where you live or your telephone number. This includes your boss, coworkers or any other contacts at your place of work. The Fair Debt Collection Practices Act does not allow a debt collector to disclose the name of the company from which he or she is calling, unless the person on the other end of the line asks. However, under no circumstances can a debt collector ever disclose to a third party that you owe a debt Furthermore, if the debt collector already knows how to get in contact with you, they should not be communicating with any third parties at all. On exception to this rule would be if the debt collector is sending legal documents to your employer connected with a proper wage garnishment.

The FDCPA also provides that a collector cannot call you at work if it has reason to know that your employer does not allow you to receive personal phone calls. If you are first called at home, make sure to tell the collection agency that they cannot call you at your place of employment. It is always best to follow up with a written request as well. If the debt collector calls you at work, make it very clear that you cannot take their calls while you are working.
If you’ve been dealing with debt collectors because of your debt, you are not alone. Call The Law Firm of Mitch Luxenburg’s experienced fair debt collection attorneys toll-free at (877) 846-1209 to find out how we can help you. You can also complete our online form for a free FDCPA case review. The debt collector has to pay your legal fees so you’ll be charged nothing for your case.

Photo by: Justin Brockie

21 Oct

By

No Comments

The Hospital Hassle: Paying Medical Bills

October 21, 2013 | By | No Comments

A single visit to the emergency room can cost you thousands of dollars, which can make paying your bills and balancing your budget difficult. Although hospitals would prefer for patients to pay up front, or settle on old bills, that often is not easily done.
hospital

To receive payment on these costly healing visits, most doctors and hospitals have turned to debt collectors. There are many large collection agencies which specialize in collecting nothing but medical debt. Some hospitals have turned to have debt collectors working onsite, who pose as employees, or at least do not make it clear that they are debt collectors. The goal is to encourage patients to make payments, or encourage them to get medical care elsewhere.

MPRnews has reported, in recent months,heathcare providers have been sued for violating federal privacy laws because they were in possession of a laptop that contained a list of personal records of over 23,000 patients. The information was used to create “stop lists” to help staff stall patients from receiving emergency care. Hospital employees were instructed to run through a prepared script to make patients believe that they would not get medical treatment until payment was made. After legal action was taken, the hospital stated that they would look into the practice of having “aggressive contractors” confronting hospital patients and not being transparent about the fact that they are actually debt collectors.

If you’ve been dealing with debt collectors, real or fake, because of your medical debt, or any other type of consumer debt, you are not alone. Call The Law Firm of Mitch Luxenburg’s experienced fair debt collection attorneys toll-free at (877) 846-1209 to find out how we can help you. You can also complete our online form for a free FDCPA case review. The debt collector has to pay your legal fees so you’ll be charged nothing for your case.

Photo by: Tompagenet

20 Oct

By

No Comments

3 Things That Can Kill The Holiday Spirit and What We Can Help You Do About Them

October 20, 2013 | By | No Comments

stress free zone (2)

1. Annoying Calls and Letters from Debt Collectors

We buy things, we pay our bills. However, even the best of us can have a bill or two fall through the cracks. Student loans, medical bills, credit card charges for holiday gifts and travel… All of these can result in annoying calls and letters from debt collectors. Especially during the holidays, when we’re all busy trying to enjoy time with our friends and family, having a debt collector or collection agency harassing you can really put a damper on your holiday spirit.

If you are being harassed, made to feel uncomfortable, or contacted by debt collectors in any way, please call us at (877) 846-1209, or fill out our form for a free case review. We will review your situation for free. There’s no cost or obligation to you for our consultation. If the debt collector is in violation of state and/or federal laws, you could be entitled to money damages. That’s right, turn the tables and make them pay you! They also have to pay your attorneys’ fees, so there is no charge to you for our time in handling your case.

2. Driving a Lemon

The simplest way to find out if your car is a “lemon” is to call us at (877) 846-1209 and speak to one of our lemon law attorneys, or fill out our form for a free lemon case review.

You may be thinking, “I know there is a lemon law in my state, but how do I know whether it applies to my vehicle?” As is often the case with the law, there is no simple answer to that question because the laws in every state are different. While we are always willing to provide a free review of your situation to see if you might qualify, generally we are interested in reviewing vehicles which were purchased new (or used but still under the manufacturer’s warranty), and which have been repaired at least three times or have been out of service by reason of repair for 20 days or longer.

Our lawyers have successfully negotiated thousands of claims with the automotive manufacturers and their lawyers. Our experience has helped us become successful at a wide variety of different lemon law cases. Whether you have a defective car, truck, recreational vehicle, motorcycle, ATV, camper, boat or other consumer product, we’re eager to hear about your situation.

3. Traffic Tickets

Millions and millions of people across the country will receive traffic tickets this year, mostly for speeding. As many as 95% of these tickets are not contested. Traffic tickets are big business for local courts and governments. Some cities generate millions of dollars a year from traffic ticket fines. Some smaller rural towns can generate most of their operating budgets from the money they earn through traffic tickets.

Most people take the path of least resistance and just pay their fines, thinking it is not worth the trouble to contest their tickets. Before you just pay up, consider that your traffic ticket could cost you a lot more than just the fine you pay. Traffic convictions and guilty pleas can result in increases in your insurance premiums of up to 50% or more.
If you get a ticket in Ohio, we can help you negotiate a lower fine (or in some cases no fine) and fewer or no points on your driving record. If your case must go to trial, we have the knowledge and experience necessary to give you the best possible chance to beat your traffic or speeding ticket. Our firm is only able to provide this service in Ohio.

We represent consumers around the country in a variety of cases, including claims involving debt collection abuses, credit reporting violations, unsolicited telephone calls, “lemon law” and breach of warranty cases for defective vehicles and other products, consumer fraud, traffic and misdemeanor criminal defense (Ohio only), and other general litigation. Even if we cannot help you, we will make every effort to put you in contact with another attorney who can.

Please visit the following web sites for more information:

www.FairDebtCollectionHelp.com

www.LemonLawyersUSA.com

www.OhioTrafficTicketHelp.com

Or call us at either (877) 846-1209 or (877) 846-1209 to speak to one of our attorneys. We are here for you!

Photo by: Michael

13 Sep

By

No Comments

How to Avoid Building Up Debt

September 13, 2013 | By | No Comments

Credit card debt can quickly become overwhelming and seemingly unmanageable. Before you start to go down a path of building up credit card debt, watch for warning signs that you are headed towards debt collectors harassing you for payments. Ask yourself these simple questions about your credit card behaviors to determine if you are headed in a direction for debt.

Do you keep track of what you spend each month against what you bring in? Do you keep regular track of your budget?
Do you use your credit card to afford big ticket items that are out of your budget?
Do you have a plan for paying off your credit card balances?
Do you use your credit card to afford basic living expenses?
Are you aware of how much interest you pay each month on your credit card balance?
Do you have more than one credit card, and transfer balances to avoid higher interest rates?
If you have multiple credit cards, are you paying off your card with the highest interest rate first?

If you’ve been dealing with debt collectors because of your credit card debt, you are not alone. Call The Law Firm of Mitch Luxenburg’s experienced fair debt collection attorneys toll-free at (877) 846-1209 to find out how we can help you. You can also complete our online form for a free FDCPA case review. The debt collector has to pay your legal fees so you’ll be charged nothing for your case.

11 Sep

By

No Comments

New Standards for Collecting on Medical Debt

September 11, 2013 | By | No Comments

Over the past few months, ACA International, the Healthcare Financial Management Association (HFMA), and a handful of organizations that represent credit bureaus and consumer protection agencies, developed “The Medical Debt Resolution Overview,” which is a collection of guidelines on how to handle collecting on medical debt.
Some of the guidelines included in The Medical Debt Resolution Overview include:
Allowing patients 120 days to pay their bill before it is reported to a credit agency
Removing paid medical debt from credit reports within 45 days of payment
Collection partners must adhere to provider’s policies and procedures. All vendors and partners involved in the collections workflow need to adhere to the provider’s policies and procedures.
Providers and partners must regularly reconcile accounts. Regular reconciliations should occur between provider system and business affiliate system
All business affiliates involved in account resolution activities are required to report and track patient complaints
Possibility for full-file credit reporting, which is when payments are reported as a positive mark on an individual’s credit report
In the next month, the hope is to have all proposed guidelines taken to Washington, and to have them shared with lawmakers in the hope to educate them on their recommendations for upcoming legislation.
If you’ve been dealing with debt collectors because of your credit card debt, you are not alone. Call The Law Firm of Mitch Luxenburg’s experienced fair debt collection attorneys toll-free at (877) 846-1209 to find out how we can help you. You can also complete our online form for a free FDCPA case review. The debt collector has to pay your legal fees so you’ll be charged nothing for your case.medical-debt

04 Sep

By

No Comments

The Business of Buying Debt

September 4, 2013 | By | No Comments

The business of buying and selling debt has become a largely profitable industry. Debt collectors purchase portfolios of debt from credit cards or stores, and net a huge profit from them.

The Federal Trade Commission found that debt buyers purchase portfolios of debt for cents on the dollar, and then attempt to collect on the full amount owed. As the debt-buying industry has grown, so have debt-collection issues. Within the last year, the FTC has reported over 180,000 cases of debt-collection abuse.

Once debt collectors purchase these portfolios, they can legally sue consumer to pay the debt that they own. Debt collection agencies file endless amounts of lawsuits against consumers who haven’t paid off their debt, even though they often don’t have the necessary proof to back their cases. Consumers may find that the amount claimed to be owed by the debt collector has increased drastically due to years of added interest.

The FTC is now encouraging states to update their laws against debt collectors to better protect consumers. These updates to laws would include making selling portfolios illegal after a certain amount of years, and better communication to consumers on the selling or purchase of their debt.

If you’ve been dealing with debt collectors because of your credit card debt, you are not alone. Call The Law Firm of Mitch Luxenburg’s experienced fair debt collection attorneys toll-free at (877) 846-1209 to find out how we can help you. You can also complete our online form for a free FDCPA case review. The debt collector has to pay your legal fees so you’ll be charged nothing for your case.

30 Aug

By

No Comments

How To Deal With Credit Card

August 30, 2013 | By | No Comments

by:  Tax Credits

by: Tax Credits

As mentioned in the article, How We Get Into Credit Card Debt, the average person has $15,950 in credit card debt and many people have much more than that . Credit card debt can be overwhelming, but there are ways to overcome it. Here is how to deal with credit card debt:

  • Stop charging.
    It sounds simple, but the first step is to stop accruing further debt on your cards. Create a budget, and use cash opposed to the credit card. Cancel any automatic purchases that are linked to your credit cards, like any membership fees or anything else that gets charged directly to your card.

  • Understand your debt.
    Write down each credit card you currently have a balance on. Include the total amount you owe and the interest rate. Look at your current statement to find out what you are paying in interest every month and how much of your payment is going towards the actual balance.

  • Make a plan.
    Now that you understand what you owe and how each card works, make a game plan. You can choose to pay off the card with the highest interest rate or the largest balance.

  • Make more than the minimum payment.
    There is a good chance, depending on the amount you owe, that the minimum payment is just paying the interest every month. Start making larger payments to get the balance down.



If you’ve been dealing with debt collectors because of your credit card debt, you are not alone. Call The Law Firm of Mitch Luxenburg’s experienced fair debt collection attorneys toll-free at (877) 846-1209 to find out how we can help you. You can also complete our online form for a free FDCPA case review. The debt collector has to pay your legal fees so you’ll be charged nothing for your case.

30 Aug

By

No Comments

What To Do If You Can’t Make Your Student Loan Payments

August 30, 2013 | By | No Comments

Dealing with student loans can be overwhelming. If you are having trouble finding a job or not earning what you thought you would be, simply making the minimum payments can be impossible. Here is what you may be able to do when you can’t make your student loan payments.

We are not recommending that you stop making your student loan payments, as this can have a significant effect on your credit record and can lead to collection proceedings, including lawsuits and wage garnishment, being instituted against you. In addition, not all of these options may be available to you depending upon the identity of your lender and the type of loan you have (e.g. government-backed or private loan).

by: marsmet471

by: marsmet471


  • Apply for a deferment.
    Depending on your lender and the type of loan you have, you may be able to apply for a deferment. This means you are deferring, or postponing, your payments for a specific period of time. Applying for a deferment most likely will require paperwork to prove why you are asking for this deferment. If you are unemployed or facing economic hardship, you may qualify. In this case, your loans may still be accruing interest.
  • Work with your lender for a payment plan.
    If you don’t qualify for a deferment, call your lender to explain your situation. They may be able to help you come up with a better payment plan based on your income or current financial situation.
  • Put your loans in forbearance.
    You may be able to stop paying on your loan for a certain amount of time, usually a few months, to stop the loan from heading into default and/or to a collection agency. This could cost an initial fee, and the loan may be accruing interest while it’s in forbearance.
  • Explore loan forgiveness.
    While it is not easy, exploring the possibility of loan forgiveness is another way to deal with the debt. With loan forgiveness, you work a certain job or volunteer to have a portion of your loans forgiven. For example, you can serve with the AmeriCorps, Peace Corps or other volunteer organizations. Depending upon your field, you may be able to sign up to work in an area lacking teachers or medical care professionals.


If your loans go into default and you are being contacted by a debt collector, call The Law Firm of Mitch Luxenburg’s experienced fair debt collection attorneys toll-free at (877) 846-1209 to find out how we can help you. You can also complete our online form for a free FDCPA case review. The debt collector has to pay your legal fees so you’ll be charged nothing for your case, even if you lose.

25 Aug

By

No Comments

How Debt Collectors Find You

August 25, 2013 | By | No Comments

photo by:  andercismo

photo by: andercismo



Did you ever wonder how debt collectors find you? Debt collectors are persistent and very rarely will they simply give up and go away. Here is how a debt collector can find you:

  • Information on your account.
    Your credit card company already knows your phone numbers for your home, work and cell, your address, e-mail address and other information. If this account, or any other, goes to collection, the debt collector has that information right in their hands.
  • Employers.
    Even if you’ve changed phone numbers or moved, a debt collector may find you through your current or former employer. If you had to list an employer or give a pay stub to the creditor to show you were working, chances are the debt collector now has that information. Depending upon what is said to your employer, these contacts are can be in violation of state and federal laws.
  • Family member, friends, or neighbors.
    A debt collector will try to contact you by any means necessary. This includes contacting any family members, friends, co-workers or neighbors that would be able to tell them where you’re living and get them in touch with you. Depending upon what is said to the third-party, these contacts are very often in violation of state and federal laws.
  • Internet search.
    A simple internet search can lead to a lot of information. Public records, any organizations you’re affiliated with or contact websites like, Whitepages.com or Spokeo.com, can give a debt collector your phone number and address.
  • Social Media.
    Whether it’s Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+, Instagram, FourSquare or whatever other types of social media you use, it is just another way the debt collector finds you. The thing about these websites, is that they aren’t only a tool to contact you, but they are a way to see your connections and attempt to contact them as well.


If a debt collector has found you and has been calling you, contact The Law Firm of Mitch Luxenburg’s experienced fair debt collection attorneys toll-free at (877) 846-1209 to find out how we can help make these annoying calls stop. You can also complete our online form for a free FDCPA case review. The debt collector has to pay your legal fees so you’ll be charged nothing for your case.