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student loans Archives - Fair Debt Collection Help

30 Aug

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What To Do If You Can’t Make Your Student Loan Payments

August 30, 2013 | By | No Comments

Dealing with student loans can be overwhelming. If you are having trouble finding a job or not earning what you thought you would be, simply making the minimum payments can be impossible. Here is what you may be able to do when you can’t make your student loan payments.

We are not recommending that you stop making your student loan payments, as this can have a significant effect on your credit record and can lead to collection proceedings, including lawsuits and wage garnishment, being instituted against you. In addition, not all of these options may be available to you depending upon the identity of your lender and the type of loan you have (e.g. government-backed or private loan).

by: marsmet471

by: marsmet471


  • Apply for a deferment.
    Depending on your lender and the type of loan you have, you may be able to apply for a deferment. This means you are deferring, or postponing, your payments for a specific period of time. Applying for a deferment most likely will require paperwork to prove why you are asking for this deferment. If you are unemployed or facing economic hardship, you may qualify. In this case, your loans may still be accruing interest.
  • Work with your lender for a payment plan.
    If you don’t qualify for a deferment, call your lender to explain your situation. They may be able to help you come up with a better payment plan based on your income or current financial situation.
  • Put your loans in forbearance.
    You may be able to stop paying on your loan for a certain amount of time, usually a few months, to stop the loan from heading into default and/or to a collection agency. This could cost an initial fee, and the loan may be accruing interest while it’s in forbearance.
  • Explore loan forgiveness.
    While it is not easy, exploring the possibility of loan forgiveness is another way to deal with the debt. With loan forgiveness, you work a certain job or volunteer to have a portion of your loans forgiven. For example, you can serve with the AmeriCorps, Peace Corps or other volunteer organizations. Depending upon your field, you may be able to sign up to work in an area lacking teachers or medical care professionals.


If your loans go into default and you are being contacted by a debt collector, call The Law Firm of Mitch Luxenburg’s experienced fair debt collection attorneys toll-free at (877) 846-1209 to find out how we can help you. You can also complete our online form for a free FDCPA case review. The debt collector has to pay your legal fees so you’ll be charged nothing for your case, even if you lose.

20 Aug

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How Do I Stop A Debt Collector From Contacting Me?

August 20, 2013 | By | No Comments

by: Pete Prodoehl

by: Pete Prodoehl


If you’ve been getting calls from a debt collector and want it to stop, it is not hopeless. Here is how to stop a debt collector from contacting you:

  • Can I simply tell a debt collector to stop contacting me?

    You can tell the debt collector that contacts you that you wish to cease all communication with you and any of your friends or family members they try to reach. However, the best thing to do to stop communication is to send a cease and desist letter.
  • What is a cease and desist letter?

    A cease and desist letter is a written notice that you send to a debt collector requesting that you they stop contacting you. Once a debt collector has received this letter, there are only a few specific reasons why they would be allowed to contact you again.
  • What should I include in this cease and desist letter?

    Keep your request simple, clear and to the point in your cease and desist letter to a collection agency. If you are not paying the debt that they are contacting you about for whatever reason, clearly state that you are refusing to pay this debt. Write that you want them to cease all communications with you from now on. If they have been contacting friends, family members or an employer, you can also include that you want to cease all their communication with any third parties as well. Include that you are sending this cease and desist letter as a legal notice under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act. Before sending the letter, make a copy of it for you records.
  • Can I send it in the mail like I do my bills or other letters?

    It is vital to send the letter certified mail with a return receipt requested, or some other method where you will have proof of delivery. You can do so by UPS or FedEx or by visiting the post office and requesting to send it certified. If you do not send it with a return receipt, there is no way to confirm that the debt collector has received it. This way, you can prove you sent it. If the debt collector doesn’t receive it, it is not legally binding.
  • Will the debt collector stop contacting me?

    As mentioned above, there are a few reasons why a debt collector could contact you again continue to call. They may contact you one more time after receiving your cease and desist letter to let them know they will no longer take action on your account. They can also contact you if they are taking further action with your account such as reporting your debt to the credit bureaus or filling a lawsuit against you.
  • If you are still contacted by a debt collector after this, call The Law Firm of Mitch Luxenburg’s experienced fair debt collection attorneys toll-free at (877) 846-1209 to find out how we can help you. You can also complete our online form for a free FDCPA case review. The debt collector has to pay your legal fees so you’ll be charged nothing for your case, even if you don’t recover a settlement of judgment.